An Experience with Whiptail Catfish Of the Genus Rineloricaria

Catfish An Experience with Whiptail Catfish Of the Genus Rineloricaria
By Ian Fuller

The term Whiptail catfish points us to a group of fishes that are very unique in their physical make up. There are many genera that fall into the category commonly referred to as ‘Whiptails’ my experience with them has been limited to members of the genus Rineloricaria. There are around forty know species of this genus all of which have distinctive long thin tapering twig like body shapes that are covered over their entire lengths by hard interlocking bony plates known as scutes. Another striking feature of these fishes is their external mouthparts that are formed into suction like pads; some being more pronounced than others and may have lace like filaments on their trailing edges. The most difficult aspect with these fishes is their identification; many species have very similar body and fin markings. Continue reading An Experience with Whiptail Catfish Of the Genus Rineloricaria

Taking the Plunge to Salt Water

Taking the Plunge to Saltwater

by Steve Matassa

I am sure many of you fresh water hobbyist have thought of getting into salt water, but are afraid of the challenge or even the expense. Well, it’s not as hard as you might think or as expensive, although, it is a little more expensive then fresh water, but it’s definitely worth it. If you have kept fresh water fish successfully, you can keep salt water fish. All you need is a little knowledge, before taking the plunge. I will try to walk you through this as simple as possible, and as cheap as possible. The cheap part probably caught your attention, right – then let’s give it a shot. Continue reading Taking the Plunge to Salt Water

Breeding the Stardust Pleco L136a

Breeding the ‘Stardust Pleco – Hypancistrus Sp. L 136a.

by Ian Fuller

Some time ago, in fact I think it was in the early part of last year, I decided to diversify a little with my fish breeding program. At that time my catfish efforts were concentrated purely on Corydoras. There was a lot of talk around the hobby about the brilliant Hypancistrus zebra, or ‘Zebra plec’ as it was commonly called. I decided then that they were a must to try and breed, especially as the price of them seamed to be ever on the increase, making them a good investment. I set out to buy some potential breeding stock, my first port of call was to friend Neil Woodward’s establishment in Wigan, where I new I would find what I was after.  Continue reading Breeding the Stardust Pleco L136a

Message to BAS Members

Dear Members,

I hope this note finds everyone in good health during these troubling times.

Not having our usual monthly events is strange to us. I know we miss the normalcy of everyday life, especially our fish club meetings, but our health and those of our loved ones is the most important thing we can consider. Social distancing prevents our events from happening.

The Brooklyn Aquarium Society wants to assure all our members that no one will lose membership dues payment time while we are not meeting during this pandemic. When we are back to normal, all regular members will be credited with the months we have lost.
Everyone stay safe and healthy, continue your water changes, and we hope to see you soon.

Steven Matassa
President

Acclimating Fish

Acclimating Fish
by Steve Matassa

There are two ways most hobbyist use to acclimate their fish. I will try to explain these methods for those of you who do not know. The first is the drip method, where you would empty the bag with the fish in to a bucket, and set up an air line with a knot in it. Then let the water slowly drip in to the bucket in till the bucket starts to fill up. Then empty some of the bucket and continue with the drip. This should take about half an hour if done right. You do not want to drip it too fast, and stress the fish. The purpose of these methods is to make the transaction for the fish as stress free as possible.

Continue reading Acclimating Fish

President’s Message – August 2020

President’s Message

All of us at BAS are hoping that everyone is well and staying safe and healthy. We all know this pandemic continues to grip our world. All of us are praying that we can resume normal life in the near future. I do not have any information as to when we can have in person BAS events at Education Hall. I have been in contact with Scott Doyle of the New York Aquarium and I am quoting his email response to my question about any updates we can share with our members. His response is:

Continue reading President’s Message – August 2020

June 12th Virtual Event – Copepods are changing the face of aquaculture By Chad Clayton

“Copepods are changing the face of aquaculture” –  By Chad Clayton

 

 

BAS Presents Chad Clayton Online Presentation – Copepods are Changing the Face of Aquaculture

When
Fri Jun 12, 2020 8pm – 9pm Eastern Time – New York
Where
Online Presentation (Virtual Meeting)
Joining info
Join with Google Meet
Join by phone
+1 706-750-9569 (PIN: 963062243)

The Aquatica & The Bulletin are being retired/archived.

With passing of our Editor, John Todaro (R.I.P John – read here) The Aquatica and The Bulletin are being archived and replaced by our new publication AquaticNews.

We are excited to announce that the position of BAS Editor was filled and our new editor, Virginia (Ginny) Cahill will be working on our beautiful new publication – AquaticNews.

Please note: Archived copies of our previous publications: The Aquatica & The Bulletin can be found here and here.

 

APRIL 10 EVENT CANCELED DUE TO COVID-19

The officers and board members of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society decided that for everyone’s safety and to minimize possibility of contracting the Corona Virus (COVID-19), our April 10th event titled “Successful Strategies for Reef Keeping by Bob Stark is canceled. Bob owns and operates ESV Aquarium Products and has been long standing supporter of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society (Thank you Bob).  His company makes outstanding products for saltwater and reef aquariums. To show your support in these hard times, please visit his website and review his offerings.

 

We apologize for any inconvenience caused and hope you stay healthy throughout the rest of the flu season.

Stay Home – Flatten The Curve!

Hoping to see you all soon.

March 13, 2020 Event Canceled Due To Corona Virus

The officers and board members of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society decided that for everyone’s safety and to minimize possibility of contracting the Corona Virus, our March 13th event should be canceled.

We apologize for any inconvenience caused and hope you stay healthy throughout the rest of the flu season.

We’ll see you at the next meeting.

 

President’s Message – February 2020

Dear Aquarist,

One of the coldest months of the year turned out to be warm and sunny when Joe Yaiullo, Curator of the Long Island Aquarium in Riverhead, Long Island arrived. His presentation entitled “Sometimes It’s The Little Things” was fascinating. This event was a wake-up call for marine and freshwater hobbyists alike because it spoke about setting up the steps to prevent catastrophe, planning ahead so disaster doesn’t strike and having redundancy parts and equipment in the event something fails. It was an enlightening and educational adventure from one of our oldest and dearest friends. Joe was kind enough to donate cuttings from the corals in his 20,000 gallon aquarium. The audience was very interested and asked many questions.

BAS has a new program that we want all to participate in. In memory of BAS Editor John Todaro we have created the John Todaro Memorial Writers Award. Any size article, you can add drawings or pictures for extra points, can be member and non-member allowed to enter, only 3 articles per author will be judged by a BAS committee. We have 1st prize is $50.-, 2nd prize is $25.-, 3rd prize is $15 and several Honorable Mention prizes of $5.- if the articles submitted warrant an award (all payments are in BAS Bucks). Starts now and ends at the July Board meeting. More on this in near future.
The winds of March will blow in Jason D’Ambrosio, President of the North Jersey Aquarium Society and his topic for the evening will be Stingray Husbandry. Yes, you can breed stingrays in your home aquarium, providing you take the necessary steps to keep them happy.

The Brooklyn Aquarium Society turned 109 years young on Valentine’s Day. We are the oldest and largest general aquarium club in the United States and that is because of you – our members, our Board and Officers and the love we all have for aquatic creatures. So come on down on March 13 for an enjoyable evening with great people. We always try to have an interesting topic for you and our aquatic auction and sales tables can’t be beat. As always there will be FREE parking and FREE refreshments, doors open at 7:30 pm.
New BAS shirts arrived along with hats and patches so get them before they sell out. We will have a new T-Shirt contest. You may submit as many entrees as you want and judging will take place at our June event. The winning T-Shirt will be available for sale at our September meeting. Many noticed the BAS officers and Board members wore the regular BAS shirt with the word TEAM on the back. We did this to identify our members that work and help organize our events.

If you want to see different speakers and learn about different aquatic systems, fish, plants and marine life, please let me know. The elected officials of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society are here to serve YOU! Please let us know what you want and why, because it would be helpful to everyone. It is important that you visit and patronize our sponsors. It goes full circle: by helping them, they are also helping you as hobbyists and everyone is helping the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, so help us, help you!

For more info, please call our BAS Hotline at (718) 837-4455, or visit our modern website at WWW.BROOKLYNAQUARIUMSOCIETY.ORG.

On a more personal note – any member who wants to attend a Board meeting, which is held at Education Hall of the New York Aquarium on the 1st Friday of the month, September through June, please notify me at (347) 277-4793 by the Tuesday before the meeting.

Steven Matassa
President

President’s Message – January 2020

Dear Aquarist,

For our first general meeting of the year we thought we would warm things up with one of our favorite speakers, Luis Morales. Luis gave a very informative presentation on “Fish Photography”. It was a great lecture for beginners and advanced hobbyists that wanted to take great photos of their favorite fish, plants or corals. Luis had given similar presentation years ago but updated it with information on the newer technology in the world of photography.

Next month we have the one and only, Joe Yaiullo, curator of the Long Island Aquarium, coming to us. Joe’s presentation for the evening is “Sometimes It’s The Little Things”. Joe generally brings his group of fans and also he may have some surprises. I suggest you come early because the meeting hall will fill up quickly.

Our February event falls on Saint Valentines Day, which is also our great Society’s birthday when we will be 109 years young. We are the oldest general aquarium club in the United States and that is because of you – our members, our Board and Officers and the love we all have for aquatic creatures. So come on down on February 14 for a fun night filled with great people, an interesting topic and aquatic auction and sales tables that can’t be beaten. As always there will be FREE parking and FREE refreshments, doors open at 7:30 pm.

Our new publication will be unveiled at this meeting. As many of you are aware our editor for over 50 years has passed away. John Todaro will be sorely missed. In John’s honor the Board has voted unanimously to create a John Todaro Memorial Writers Program, which will be presented at this meeting.

Ginny Cahill has picked up the reins and decided to run with a new publication that combines the Bulletin and the Aquatica into one, quarterly publication. This will be an email only publication to active members only.

If you want to see different speakers and learn about different aquatic systems, fish, plants and marine life, please let me know. The elected officials of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society are here to serve YOU! Please let us know what you want and why, because it would be helpful to everyone. It is important that you visit and patronize our sponsors. It goes full circle: by helping them, they are also helping you as hobbyists and everyone is helping the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, so help us, help you!

For more info, please call our BAS Hotline at (718) 837-4455

On a more personal note – any member who wants to attend a Board meeting, which is held at Education Hall of the New York Aquarium on the 1st Friday of the month, September through June, please notify me at (347) 277-4793 by the Tuesday before the meeting.

Steven Matassa
President

 

Win 170 Gallon System from Algae Barn!

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No Tricks, No Scavenger Hunts… Simply visit pages and sponsors and say “Happy Holidays” “Merry Christmas” or whatever you would like to thank them for helping us to setup this incredible giveaway!

New Videos, Blog Posts, Sponsors Pages and more every Monday until 2020!

As a bonus, You will RANDOMLY be given gifts of REAL PRODUCTS for free, from us here at Algaebarn, As a Thank you for an incredible 2019! Two Runners up will get Ecopods and phyto subscriptions for a YEAR!

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President’s Message – November 2019

Dear Aquarist,

Our November event was a cold and windy one. Our guest speaker warmed us up though with a great presentation and he came with a few boxes of raffle prizes, which made everyone happy. Lou Ekus, CEO of Tropic Marin came down from Massachusetts and his topic for the evening was, “Reef Chemistry Made Easy.” Lou takes the guess work out of chemicals in our reef aquariums and simplifies the entire environment. It was a great talk from a wonderful person.
November was our semi-annual 50/50 on livestock. We had many bags of high quality freshwater fish, marine fish, both fresh and marine plants and invertebrates, along with hard to get live corals. Many attendees went away with great bargains. We had aquariums, lighting, pumps, filters, aquatic supplies and fish/plant and coral foods. Everything you need to keep and maintain your aquatic creatures with the best of everything to keep them happy and healthy.

All this would not be possible without our sponsors, both local stores and manufactures. When you go to the local pet shops let them know you are a BAS member. They need to know we are giving back to them. We also have many members donate to our club every meeting. If you have old tank, equipment (that still functions), or healthy livestock that you wish to donate you can bring them to any meeting.

Our next meeting is our Holiday Party on December 13, from 7:00 -10:00 pm at the Legends Bar & Grill, 2128 Flatbush Avenue, just off Quentin Road. Please see our notice in this Bulletin. There is no regular meeting and no fish, just good friends and family gathering for holiday festivities. Hope to see you there. Don’t forget that on January 10, 2020 we have Luis Morales as our guest speaker. Luis’s topic for the evening will be “Fish Photography” followed by our auction. As always there will be FREE parking and FREE refreshments at our January event.

New BAS shirts arrived and they were selling like hotcakes! Many of you noticed that the BAS officers and Board members wore the regular BAS shirt with the word TEAM on the back. We did this to identify our members that work and help organize our events. We also have new BAS hats in a light blue color.

If you want to see different speakers and learn about different aquatic systems, fish, plants and marine life, please let me know. The elected officials of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society are here to serve YOU! Please let us know what you want and why, because it would be helpful to everyone. It is important that you visit and patronize our sponsors. It goes full circle: by helping them, they are also helping you as hobbyists and everyone is helping the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, so help us, help you!

For more info, please call our BAS Hotline at (718) 837-4455

On a more personal note – any member who wants to attend a Board meeting, which is held at Education Hall of the New York Aquarium on the 1st Friday of the month, September through June, please notify me at (347) 277-4793 by the Tuesday before the meeting.

Steven Matassa
President

R.I.P – BAS Editor, John Todaro 1938-2019

It is with deep sorrow that we must report the passing of our Editor John Todaro. For BAS, moving forward will be difficult. As you are aware John created the Bulletin and the Aquatica – he was truly a special person.

John Joseph Todaro
1938 – 2019

Born and raised in New York City, John
Todaro served in the U.S. Army in Fort Rucker,
Alabama. John published a children’s book –
Phillip the Flower Eating Phoenix. He was an
art director for the McCann, Erikson and Ted
Bates advertisement agencies. A man of creative
pursuits, his hobbies included photography,
pottery, watercolors, woodworking and tropical
fish.

John’s passion and love for the Brooklyn
Aquarium Society (BAS), of which he was a club
member for greater than 50 years, combined his
creative genius and his leadership abilities. John
was the Corresponding Secretary, Exchange Editor
and Editor of two of the Societies publications
The Bulletin and The Aquatica (The Brooklyn
Aquarium Society was the only club in the
United States to publish two aquatic magazines
thanks to John). John became President of the
Brooklyn Aquarium Society in 2001 through 2003.
As President, John created the club’s Education
Program which brought aquariums to public
and private schools throughout New York City
and allowed our talented members to provide
presentations to schools, community centers and
senior citizen facilities. As President Emeritus, he
created the Centennial Journal of the Brooklyn
Aquarium Society and the 100th Birthday party at
the New York Aquarium in 2011.

In 2004 John and his son Andrew moved to
Vermont. John passed peacefully in his home on
Thursday, October 17, 2019. He was 81 years old.
John is succeeded by his three children (Christie
Potter and Andrew and Anna Todaro) and his two
grandchildren (Riley and Ella Potter).

RIP John – you will be deeply missed.

Driftwood Can Cause Weird Fish Problems

Driftwood Can Cause Weird Fish Problems
by Joe Graffagnino

Did you ever have fish problems that didn’t fall into the routine of fish sickness that was easily diagnosed?  For quite a while I had strange symptoms in one large aquarium that I could not guess the cause of what was happening to my fish. Eventually it was diagnosed correctly, but the loss of fish and the work involved to correct the problems will make me, and hopefully, you, take common sense and prudent actions prior to adding anything to an established aquarium. Let me tell my “tale of woe” from the beginning and learn from my laziness and not using common sense.

I went to a major fish convention a couple of years ago and while visiting the vendor booths I noticed a large piece of driftwood. It was all branches, strategically placed together with disguised stainless steel screws. The piece was approximately 16 inches wide, 15 inches high and 2 ½ – 3 feet long. I thought to myself ”… that this would be a perfect addition to my 180 gallon (2’W X 20”H X 7’L) tank”. After settling on a price I asked the vendor about the wood, where it came from, how was it assembled and what did I need to do prior to placing it into my aquarium. The wood came from the banks of rivers in Maine, the screws were all stainless steel and covered by going deep into the wood or with the use of a wood patch that goes over the screw top, to provide that natural look. The piece was already bleached and cured so that I could put it into my tank immediately. I was grateful for that because how was I going to find a container large enough to hold a wood piece that large, for bleaching and curing with cold water, for a week?

I returned home, rearranged the tank and placed the piece in the center. It was a beautiful addition to the tank and the African cichlids enjoyed it immensely. For 3 months all was fine, then strange fish problems started appearing:
• Theraps nicuaraguense started having gill infections. The bottom of the gills would be bright red and extend out of the gill covers. The nicuaraguense also developed bacterial fin and tail rot.
• Tropheus moorii “ilangi” developed “bloat” in three (3) fish, others started darting and scratching continuously.
• Aulonocara “peacocks” developed cataracts over their eyes.
• Haplochromis nubulis developed dark or black markings on their bodies and fins, along with cataracts over their eyes. These dark markings seemed to be moving. Two fish developed “popeye” and died within two days.
• Sciaenochromis ahli “Electric blue” developed dark or black markings on their bodies and fins, but without cataracts over their eyes. These dark markings also seemed to be moving.
• Labidochromis caeruleus (“yellow labs”) developed burns on their skin and on a couple of fish the disease ate threw the outer skin and exposed the internal organs, but the exposed skin and organs never fungused.

At first, I didn’t know what to blame for these multiple problems. Different species had different problems and not every fish of that same species was effected. It appeared to be a “hit or miss” on certain fish, in certain species. It also seemed that fish from different areas were affected differently. Central American T. nicuaraguense had gill infections and bacterial fin and tail rot, but only in the mature fish; the younger fish of the same species had no signs of problems. The Lake Malawi A. peacocks, Yellow labs and Electric blues exhibited different symptoms, while the Lake Tanganyikcan T. ilangi developed “bloat” and darting symptoms and from Lake Victoria the Haplochromis nubulis showed the markings and eye cataract symptoms.

I performed multiple water changes starting at 50%, waiting a week then I started on antibiotics, I continued water changes but 25- 30%, while medicating the tank. I started with Aquarium Products “Aquari-Sol” and then Aquarium Pharmaceuticals “MelaFix”. “MelaFix” helped the T. nicuaraguense with their gill problems and the T. moorii with their bloat (those that had the “bloat” died and others did not catch it) and darting/scratching problems, but did nothing for the body markings and eye cataract problems. I then separated and isolated those fish with the same or similar problems and treated them with different medications. In all, I tried Mardel Laboratories “MarOxy”, for bacterial diseases, and Mardel Laboratories “Maracide” for body flukes, flashing and external parasites. I also tried Aquatronics “Super Ick Plus” for scratching and darting and protozoan parasites and I finally used Aquarium Products “Clout”. Needless to say, I was losing weak fish and not curing anything. I went so far as to give direct treatment baths, tried to scrape off, what I believed to be, the eye and body flukes. After discussing these problems and remedies with several members of our fish club, the prominent suggestion was an infestation of body flukes.

It was recommended that I read an article in Tropical Fish Hobbyist (TFH) magazine, August 2001, titled “Flashing and Flukes” by Terry Fairfield. The article had some inferences that were similar to my fish problems but not exact. I emailed Dr. Fairfield and we discussed some possible remedies, but none of the diseases fitted into a “correct cure” area. Dr. Fairfield was against the use of all these medications; he valued the use of water changes, proper diet, uncrowded tank and the use of a diatom filter. As an example, the fish that had the body and eye flukes did not scratch or rub to remove the parasite; that was strange. I also could not remove these eye or body flukes by hand or cyst bath; another oddity. The only recourse left to me was to use Furan, a very powerful medication, but the remaining fish were weak from treatments and constant water changes, with Kosher salt treatments. I could not subject them to this radical treatment, for I was certain that I would lose them all. I felt that I was a drug store for fish, yet almost nothing worked. I was adding vitamins to the tank, specifically B1 and B12 to help the repair of fins.

Meanwhile, I was reading everything I could get my hands on to have another possibility to stop this crazy problem in my largest tank. The other tanks (10 –12 of them) did not exhibit any symptoms. I noticed that the November meeting of the North Jersey Aquarium Society had as guest speaker Doctor Alistair Dove, of the New York Aquarium. Dr. Dove’s topic was “Parasites and Fishes”. Dr. Dove works practically in my neighborhood. I must give him a call. Before I could place that call I read an article that stated the symptoms my fish were having could have been caused by birds that eat parasitic fish. The bird droppings are then eaten by snails or are dropped onto the wood, and that it how it could be introduced into the aquarium. Now it started to make sense; this problem started after I introduced the large wood piece into the aquarium. I still didn’t understand why there were so many different problems, but at least I had the cause of all of them. I then did what I should have done from the beginning – I got a large plastic garbage pail and I performed the bleach and water treatment to that wood piece. After 3 days of soaking in bleach and water, I removed it and washed out the plastic pail, letting it sundry. I then filled it up again with fresh water and placed the wood into it again for another week. It didn’t quite last a week because on the 5th day the pail broke, possibly from the bleach or the pushing of the wood piece. I then let the wood piece sundry for several days, making sure no snails or birds could get to it. I then re-introduced it to the same tank. I have not had a problem since then.

I finally called Dr. Dove at the New York Aquarium and he stated that he knew exactly what the problem was. He agreed with me that the wood piece was the cause of all the problems. He said that the black fluke markings and eye flukes were not body or eye flukes at all, but were a form of melanoma (skin cancer). Whatever was in the wood caused different problems with your fish. The good news was that it was not contagious to people or other fish, the bad news was that there was no cure for it. The fish are still living, eating and breeding. Their offspring show no signs of any problem.

I hope that after you read this article you will take the extra step and bleach any object you seek to place into your aquarium. Don’t be lazy. Use common sense when buying objects for your aquarium in order to protect yourself and your fish. When this craziness happens to you the only person you have to blame is yourself.

JRoe GoUrmet Fish Food

February 21, 2004 – updated December 15, 2015
J/Roe Gourmet Fish Food
By Joe Graffagnino

This receipt was borrowed from other receipts and advice from reputable Aquarists, hobbyists and retailers. It has, what we believe to be, the best for coloration, growth, and leaves no protein/oil residue on surface of water. We are feeding the fish 2 X’s per week.

3 – 4 oz. jars of creamed spinach (Gerber #2)
3 – 4 oz. jars of peas (Beechnut #1)
3 – 4 oz. jars of green beans (Beechnut #1)
3 – 4 oz. jars of sweet potatoes (Beechnut #1)
3 – 4 oz. jars of carrots (Beechnut #1)
1 – 4 oz. jars of peaches (Beechnut #1)
6 oz. of freeze-dried Krill (crushed) or more if needed to have a firm consistency
1/2 lb. scallops (raw)
1/2 lb. Scrod fish (raw)
1/2 lb. shrimp (boil 2 minutes & shelled)
Grate the scallops, Scrod & shrimp in osterizer with 1/2 cup water
4 tablespoons of Tetra Bits
2 teaspoons of Paprika powder
1 1/2 tablespoons of Spirulina powder
2 tablespoons of wheat germ
12 oz. Romaine lettuce
1 head of garlic
1/2 teaspoon of grated Anise seeds
2 tablespoons Brewers Yeast powder
6 tablespoons of single grain oatmeal Baby cereal by Gerber
3 hard boiled egg yolks (grated)
2 cups of large food pellets(color enhancer) by Green Thumb Aquatics (grated) [can substitute with High Pro dog food]
* Mix together until a thick paste develops; if too moist add more freeze dried Krill.
Fill quart size (7” X 8”) plastic zip lock bags until 1/8” thick, for ease of breaking off, throughout the bag and freeze. Date the bags.
Should make 13 bags of food, make no more than can be used in a few months.

Ingredients and Cost

Spirulina powder from Algae Feast Spirillina, Earthrise company, 424 Payran St., Petalama, CA. 94952 (707) 778-9078, fax (707) 778-9028.
A 1 pound jar costs $20.

Freeze-dried Krill is a color enhancer and coagulator. Its ingredients are 60% protein, 19% fiber, 6% moisture and 200 IU Vitamin E (soybean).
Krill is the bonding agent, if using krill you don’t need gelatin.

Paprika is a color enhancer, it has 2% Vitamin A.

Brewers Yeast Powder (1 lb.4 oz. container). 60 calories, 1% fat, 3% sodium, 6 grams sugar carbohydrate, 6 grams protein, 35% Riboflavin, 30%Niacin, 30% Vitamin B-6, 15% Folate, 6% Biotin,15% Pantothenic acid, 20% phosphorus and 140% Thiamin.

Tetra Bits (2.65 oz.) is a color enhancer. 46% protein, 5% fat, 2% fiber and 6% moisture.

Single Grain Oatmeal cereal for baby (Gerger). 60 calories, 1 gram fat, 50 mg. potassium, 10 grams carbohydrates, 1 gram fiber, 2 gram (10%)protein, 2% vitamin A, 25% vitamin C, 15% calcium, 60% iron, 15% vitamin E, 45% thiamin, 45% riboflavin, 25% niacin,15% phosporus, 8% zinc.

Green Beans #1 (4 oz. jar) (Beechnut). 35 calories, 3 grams sugar, 2 grams fiber, 7 grams total carbohydrates, 10 mg. sodium, 180 mg. potassium, 1 gram (6%) protein, 35% vitamin A, 6% calcium, 6% iron.

Peas #1 (4 oz. jar) (Beechnut). 60 calories, 4 grams sugar, 3 grams fiber, 10 grams total carbohydrates, 10 mg. sodium, 130 mg. potassium, 4 gram (15%) protein, 30% vitamin A, 8% vitamin C, 2% calcium, 4% iron.

Peaches #1 (4 oz. jar) (Beechnut). 60 calories, 10 grams sugar, 2 grams fiber, 14 grams total carbohydrates, 10 mg. sodium, 200 mg. potassium, 40% vitamin A, 45% vitamin C.

Sweet Potatoes #1 (4 oz. jar) (Beechnut). 80 calories, 9 grams sugar, 1 grams fiber, 17 grams carbohydrates, 10 mg. sodium, 260 mg. potassium, 2% protein, 380% vitamin A, 2% calcium, 2% iron.

Carrots #1 (4 oz. jar) (Beechnut). 40 calories, 5 grams sugar, 2 grams fiber, 8 grams carbohydrates, 30 mg. sodium, 160 mg. potassium, 2% protein, 440% vitamin A, 2% calcium.
Spinach creamed #2 (4 oz. jar) (Gerber). 50 calories, 3 grams sugar, 1 gram fat, 2 grams fiber, 8 grams carbohydrates, 40 mg. sodium, 210 mg. potassium, 3 grams (16%) protein, 210% vitamin A, 2 % vitamin C, 15% calcium, 40% iron, 10% zinc .

$ COST $
$13.02 Krill (.87 oz. container) & Tetra Bits
$ 1.77 Gerber spinach
$10.99 Brewers Yeast
$17.94 Oatmeal, paprika, anise & remainder of baby foods
$ .33 for 3 eggs
$ 6.50 fresh fish, shrimp & scallops and freezer bags (20 bags quart size)
$28.45 freeze-dried krill (1 lb.4oz.)
$20.00 spirulina powder
———
$99.00