Author Archive

President’s Message – May 2017

by on May.22, 2017, under President's Message

Dear Aquarist,

May’s flowers also brought in our Giant Spring Auction. We had hundreds of items on our tables, from fish to plants to corals to equipment and supplies, including aquariums, stands and nano systems. If you could not find something that you could have brought home, then you are not a tropical fish hobbyist. We had three auctioneers with each going in rapid fire succession. That was the only way we could finish by midnight. Much thanks and appreciation to Bill Amely, Dan Puleo and the great Dennis Alestra! A special thanks to you, our members, for making it all possible. It’s your donations that keep us successful, so please keep them coming.

Prior to our June event, we will have completed our trip to the National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD. We will also have made stops at Discus Hans and House of Tropics aquarium. We joined with a host of other clubs to make this a true sharing of aquatic joy. We have almost 60 people attending from our club, Danbury, CT, North Jersey A.S., Greater City A.S. and the Potomac Valley A.S. of Maryland/Virginia area. We will post pictures of this multiple club event in our next publication.

June will be our last event before our summer break. Our season will end on a fantastic note by having Ruben Lugo as our guest speaker. Ruben is the “Pied Piper” of catfish. If he can’t get them to breed, then they are dead, and even then he could probably nudge a fertilized egg or two. Ruben’s topic for the evening will be My Adventures Keeping & Breeding L-number & Other Fish That Suck.

We will also have our yearly elections in June.  If you are a BAS member for 6 months or more, you can run for an officer or Board member position. We have had several positions open as well as Board member slots available. This is your club, please volunteer to help us, help you. Please come to vote for the running of your society.

As always, we will have free parking and free refreshments. Our regular monthly event auctions have great items available, but they do go quick.  In response to your requests, we have changed our routine.  Doors open at 7:30 pm, for viewing of auction items. The speaker will go on at 8:00 pm, so be on time, and last for one hour. Our auction will commence within 15 minutes after the speaker concludes, with the goal of having the meeting end earlier than it has in the past. Our new auction routine is that you raise your hand when the auctioneer calls an item that you want to bid on. Please keep your hand up until it goes past the amount you wanted to spend for it.

We would like to thank our members and our sponsors for their constant generous donations that keep us going.  Anyone who has any aquatic items, supplies or equipment, which would include healthy livestock of fish, corals or plants, we always welcome the donation.

If anyone has any topics they want to hear an expert speak about, or any specific speaker, please tell us.

 

Steven Matassa
President

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President’s Message – April 2017

by on Apr.20, 2017, under President's Message

Dear Aquarist,

The April event brought back a great friend, Todd Gardner. Todd has been a mainstay speaker for our club for almost two decades. He also donated marine fish babies that his school and business venture breed in-house. Truly unbelievable! Todd spoke on very rare and very expensive imported fish that his group is trying to breed locally. He has had some success in this area. We wish him the best in all of his ventures!

Next month not only brings May flowers but also our giant auction. We plan on having an unbelievable array of freshwater, marine and brackish water species, along with plants, corals and marine plants and invertebrates. Make no mistake: be there or lose out on unbelievable and rare species that you may never see again.

As always, we will have free parking and free refreshments. There are sure to be great items available, but they do go quickly. In response to your requests, we have changed our routine. Doors open at 7:30 pm for viewing of auction items. THERE WILL NOT BE A GUEST LECTURER AT OUR MAY EVENT, ONLY A FEW HUNDRED ITEMS FOR YOUR AQUATIC PLEASURE!

We would like to thank our members and our sponsors for their constant generous donations that keep us going. Anyone who has any aquatic items, supplies or equipment, and that would include healthy livestock of fish, corals or plants, we always welcome the donation.

If anyone has any topics they want to hear an expert speak on, or any specific speaker, please tell us.

Steven Matassa
President

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Membership Specials – Take Advantage Now!

by on Apr.07, 2017, under Announcements

Dear all,

Here is a special we’ve never done before.

 

Between today and June 9th, 2017 if you sign up or renew your membership we will extend your membership length two-fold.

Example you sign up or renew and pay for a year; we’ll give you two!

Sign up or re-new for 2 years and we’ll extend you membership for four!

Sign up or re-new for 4 years and we’ll extend your membership for eight years total!!!

This is a great opportunity to save on membership fees. Combine this with multi-year discount and you can get an 8-year membership with this for $68 or family membership for $85.  That is an amazing deal!

 

This is available to all. New, Expired or Current.  You don’t have to wait for your membership expires.

Sign up or renew online or at one of our meetings before June 9th.

Click Here to Proceed.

 

 

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Spawning Angels :: BAS Articles

by on Mar.28, 2017, under Aquatica Articles, Freshwater Fish

 

Spawning Angels

I have been keeping fish for a long time, actually as long as I can remember. I have kept many different species from reef, to salt, to fresh. I have bred many types of livebearers over the years, but never egg layers, at least not until recently. My Koi angels recently spawned (given to me by a friend and B.A.S. member Bob Strazzulla). Bob had given me some angelfish from his personal supply. I really wasn’t even trying to breed them, but it happened anyway.

About two months ago my wife woke me up to tell me the angels were laying eggs, and I had to come down and look. I‘m glad she did, because it is a pretty cool thing to watch. I have seen a lot of livebearers have babies, and that also is a great thing to watch, but this is about a male and female working together. The female laying the eggs and the male following up to fertilize them, working together as one. They picked a leaf on an Anubias plant in the tank to deposit the eggs. The first thing I did was to put up a divider to keep the other fish away. The other fish were trying to get to the eggs, and the parents were defending them. It shows you how the parenting instinct takes over. I used some egg crate material covered with an air conditioner filter to keep them separated.

The next day I called another friend, and B.A.S member Joe Cingari. Joe has tanks all over his house filled with his own spawn of angels, so I figured he has to know a little something about rearing the fry. I would pick his brain a little. After all that’s one of the great things about being part of an aquarium society – sharing ideas, and experiences with each other.

I have also picked Joe Graffagnino’s brain on many occasions, and I don’t want to leave him out. Take information from different breeders, and then use what you want, to come up with what works best for you.

I have tried a few different ways of rearing the fry. First thing was to set up a five gal tank with 100% of the water from the parent’s tank. Only fill it half way at first because it’s easier for the fry to find food. Use an air stone, box filter, or sponge filter, set the aeration low, but enough for movement around the eggs.

Take the eggs out as soon as the parents are finished. This worked well, as long as you keep removing the eggs that turn white (which is fungus) because they are not fertilized, and will in turn fungus the fertile eggs. The best thing to do to remove fungused eggs is to knock them off with a thin rigid tube, and siphon out. I did this method with the first batch. The problem I found is when the eggs are removed, the parents started fighting. It appears that they were blaming each other for the loss of the eggs, so I had to separate them immediately. It’s a good thing fish have short memories. After three or four days I put them back, and they seemed to forget all about it.

Like clock work two weeks later they started spawning again. This time I wanted to try a different approach. I would leave them in to see how their parenting was.  I watched them as often as possible, and they appeared fine. They were taking turns blowing on the eggs, and guarding them even though they were the only fish on that side of the divider. In a couple of days you could see the fry trying to get out of the egg sacs. The parents were still watching over them like hawks. I kept a close eye on them, and a few days later they were hopping on the plant leaf, but still not able to swim. In a few more days I saw they were all swimming, and surrounding the parent. A hundred or so like a swarm of bees around the parents, another very cool thing to witness. If the fry would swim too far away, the parents would take them in their mouths and bring them back to safety.

I figured I had great parents, and I would leave them to see what happened. Unfortunately what happened was two days later they ate all but four of the fry. I wasn’t very happy with this method. I would try something different next time.

Two weeks later, you guessed it, they spawned again. I wanted to try leaving the eggs in again, but this time I would remove the fry as soon as they were free swimming, but I was afraid they would fight again. I removed about half the fry the first night and the rest the next day. The parents seem to be fine when I removed only half they were not fighting. With this method I was able to get about fifty fry out, the parents probably ate some.

Two weeks later they spawned again. This time as soon as they were free swimming I removed all of the fry. The parents started fighting again, as soon as I removed the fry, so I separated them for about four days to prevent the fighting, and also give them a break to recuperate before putting them together again. It’s a good idea to separate them just so they could get a rest from spawning. If you don’t they will just keeping spawning until you burn them out. The male I have is relentless (like most males), so I have to separate them, or he will torture the female.

Raising the fry was another issue. I did not want to start raising brine shrimp, so Joe had given me some vinegar eels. He also told me to try frozen baby brine shrimp. They both work well, so I would switch off to give them a little variety. As the fry get a little bit bigger you can crush flake food very fine, or buy fry food. As long as the fry are eating, it‘s ok. Either way it is very important to remove uneaten food, or dead fry, as it will pollute the water. No matter what you do you will lose some fry so don’t be discouraged.

Keeping the water as clean as possible is crucial in raising the fry. This means lots of water changes. I change about 10% almost every day. Keep in mind the fry are very sensitive to change. The water temperature and pH must be the same. I find the best way to do this is use the water from the parent’s tank for water changes. You kill two birds with one stone. You are doing water changes in the parent tank as well as the fry tank at the same time. As the fry get bigger you can mix in fresh water in with the water from the parent’s tank. Just don’t forget to adjust the pH and temperature, and of course remove chlorine or chloramines with a good water conditioner. I keep my pH at 7.0, and my temperature about 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit.

When the fry are first hatched they do not look at all like angels, but after a few weeks as they get larger they will take the angelfish shape. As they start to get bigger, this means larger grow out tanks, or more tanks. If the spawns get too much to handle, you can always separate the parents until you are ready again. If you have too many babies you can always donate some to the society. That’s what keeps aquarium societies going. It’s also nice to talk to other members who have obtained your spawns to see how they are doing, and maybe even breeding them.

Egg layers are an experience you will not forget if you are lucky enough to catch them in the act, so give it a shot, and enjoy.  I have to go, they are at it again. Good luck.

 

Author: Steve Matassa

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Rainbow Fish :: BAS Articles

by on Mar.28, 2017, under Aquatica Articles, Freshwater Fish

 

Rainbow Fish

Rainbow fish are fascinating creatures. They are fast swimmers, brightly colored and it’s fun to watch a group of them traveling across long aquariums. Rainbow fish are in with many other fish species called Cyprinids. Cyprinids have Barbs, Rainbows and goldfish type fish within that grouping. Rainbow fish are in their own groupings that have several “family” groupings such as Melanotaenia (Australia and New Guinea), Caimsichthys, Chilathernia, Glossolepis, Rhadinocentrus, Iriatherina ”Thread Fins” (Australia and New Guinea) Bedotia (Madagascar), Telmatherina (Celabes Rainbow) and the Blue Eyed Rainbows Pseudomugil, Kiunga and Scaturignichthys.

For the most part breeding Rainbow fish is relatively easy. They are mop spawners, which means they scatter their eggs in and about plants or for hobbyists artificial yarn mops. Different types of Rainbows like to lay their eggs on or in different sections of the mop. As an example it has been my experience that Melanotaenia praecox rainbows like to lay their eggs at the top of the mop, even going so far as to lay eggs in the knot and on the cork. Pseudomugil gertrudae rainbows like the bottom portion of the mop, Melanotaenia boesemani eggs you’ll find everywhere but a larger concentration will be in the middle area, Melanotaenia herbertaxelrodi (Yellow Rainbow) eggs are everywhere as are the Glossolepis wamamensis (Emerald Rainbow). This is no hard and fast rule, but if you start to search for eggs, knowing their preferences will save you time in your search. Also the mops do not have to be floating. Rainbows will spawn on mops at the bottom of the tank.

The color of the mop is important. Many people say that fish are color blind. This may be so, but I have proven to myself that certain types of Rainbows prefer certain colors to others to lay their eggs on. Not for all species but the majority of the Rainbows that I have spawned have preferred lighter colors to darker ones. My green and light blue colored mops have had greater quantities of eggs over my black and purple mops.

Young fish often have juvenile females laying eggs but the male is not mature enough to fertilize them. In this instance you will see the eggs on the mop but after a day or so they will become opaque and will easily crush. Fertile eggs start developing a dark spot that will grow out until the egg appears almost brown. The eggs will hatch within a couple of weeks depending on the species. You can tell when a male is ready to spawn and is mature enough in size and age is when his body gets bright and colorful and his fins darken and his forehead between his front dorsal fin and the tip of his nose changes into a bright color. This is for Melanotaenia and Glossolepis species. The Pseudomugil types, which are much smaller, display with their elongated fins and tail strutting their finage.

How do you know that the fish have spawned? Very easy! Take the mop out of the tank, squeeze the water from it and look for tiny little pearls. In juvenile fish the females will lay eggs early in their life and the males are not sexually mature enough to fertilize them. The eggs you find from young fish may appear to be fine but they will soon go to an opaque white and fungus up. Good eggs are clear if freshly laid and when you pluck them from the yarn (they are semi adhesive) they are hard to the touch, can’t crush them between your fingers. Unfertilized eggs can easily be squashed. After a few days the eggs start to darken as the embryo develops. I generally pluck the eggs from the mop and place them into a floating plastic container with water from the same tank and a micro mini drop of Acriflavin to prevent egg fungus. I also add small Malaysian trumpet or burrowing snails because they eat any debris and dead eggs but do not eat fertile eggs. If you have ever breed killie fish, it’s done the exact same way.

Water conditions are neutral pH [7.0](a few species like more acidic and lower pH and some species like the water significantly harder, and alkaline water and some even like it brackish. I have found that if acclimated slowly they respond well to a neutral to alkaline pH 7.0 – 7.6 with a DH of 6-9. They will respond to breeding in this environment also. The exception to this rule would be the Blue eye types that are smaller and less tolerant of changes. Food is anything. They are omnivores, which means flake food, small pellets, live or frozen mosquito larvae, black or blood worms, brine shrimp or freeze dried foods. You will find a greater amount of egg laying and a higher survival rate of fry living without handicaps using live food over flake or pellet foods. Sizes vary from 1 inch to 6 inches, depending on species. Where are they found? New Guinea, Australia, and a species in Madagascar.

Raising the fry can be challenging for some species because of their minute size. The Glossolepis types have very tiny fry and extra small powder food must be used for the first few weeks alternated with vinegar eels. These fry are too small to take baby brine shrimp, crushed flakes or APR food. As the fry get larger they can be feed micro worms (only if you have ammonia chips in the corner filter), live or frozen baby brine shrimp, crushed high quality flake food, and crushed freeze dried blood worms.
Many Rainbow fish are cannibalistic with smaller fry so that means to move the larger fry into “grow out” tanks or they will eat their siblings. After the first month perform a 10% water change of the same temperature as the tank water. Feed several times a day but do not overfeed – only a little bit per feeding or you will foul the water.

Fish I have kept successfully:
Melanotaenia splendida inornata Aureus Rainbow
Bedotia geayi Madagascar Rainbow
Melanotaenia nigrans Australian Rainbow
Melanotaenia pracox Pracox Rainbow
Pseudomugil gertrudae Gertrude’s Rainbow
Glossolepis pseudoinicisus Millenium/Tami River Rainbow
Glossolepis dority Emerald or Dority’s Rainbow
Melanotaenia herbertaxelrodi Yellow Rainbow
Melanotaenia boesemani Boesemani Rainbow

Fish I have had little success or complete failure in keeping:
Pseudomugil furcatus “Half Back Rainbow”
Pseudomugil signifer very easily put into shock
Melanotaenia parva placed 7 adults in my tank and they all died within two weeks.

Important – If you plan to breed these fish keep them in tanks by themselves. Rainbow fish will interbreed with other types similar to their own. You will obtain hybrid fish which are unacceptable in the hobby.

Enjoy these fish for they are always active, brightly colored and generally easy to care for. They will give you years of enjoyment, which is a great return for a small investment.

Author: Joe Graffagnino

Credits:
http://members.optushome.com.au/chelmon/Contents.htm
Rainbowfish web site

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The Case of the Ancistrus Assassin :: BAS Articles

by on Mar.28, 2017, under Aquatica Articles

 
The Case of the Ancistrus Assassin

 
This strange, twisted and bizarre case of murder and mayhem started about three (3) years ago. I ventured into a tropical fish auction and discovered, much to my delight, a group of five (5) bushy nose Ancistrus up for auction. The fish were approximately 3 inches in length and two (2) of them were sporting their trademark bristles. I have heard from other hobbyists that these fish are easy to breed, maintenance is next to nothing and they will eat anything. I learned later that whoever sold me this “bill of goods” did not have these particular fish in mind.

 

I said to myself that I must have these little beauties, at almost any cost. I had a nice 20-gallon long, filled with clay pots, ceramic logs and algae covered stones just waiting for this algae eating, hide and seek, catfish. I was also thinking that spawning these fish would give me the fifth (5th) type of catfish or loach spawning that was required for my hobbyist clubs “Breeder Specialist Award. I figured that I could earn some easy BAP (Breeder Award Points) scores and obtain a coveted “Specialist Award” in the process. My greedy little mind started adding up the points these beauties would obtain for me, even though I still didn’t have them yet. I also thought of the great prestige of having the rare “Specialist” award presented to me. This was not just any “Specialist” award; oh no this was for CATFISH! This would be quite an honor. After all, almost anyone could spawn cichlids or livebearers or even propagate plants, but only the best were able to breed CATFISH!

 

I could hardly contain myself when the group came up to the auction block. The auctioneer started the process by stating how wonderful these fish were and that they would be interesting, if you ever saw them after placing them in an aquarium. He droned on about the only time that you saw them was when they died. He mumbled about they were fussy eaters and defecated a lot. He was not the type of auctioneer I would want to have trying to sell my fish. He was like a screen door salesman for submarines. Anyway the bidding started at $3.00. I immediately wanted to eliminate the competition by making a “jump bid” of $5.00. Well this had the desired effect because no one else bid on them. “Those fools, what were they ever thinking?” “Don’t they realize they are letting these classic beauties slip out of their grasp for “loose change”?” Well their loss is my gain. I immediately paid for them and left for home with my prize bag of future BAP points.

 

I performed the “drip” method of acclimating these little wonders into their new home. It took several hours, but I didn’t want anything happening to these treasures. They immediately loved their new home. They quickly disappeared under rocks, into caves and hid themselves very effectively. For several months the only time I had the opportunity to see them in action was with the lights out, using a flashlight with a red lens cover on and after feeding algae wafers and frozen zucchini tied to rocks. It was interesting to note that one of the males was pushing out the other male and the females when it came to feeding time, I believed that this was just a “macho” display of bravado to impress the ladies. Little did I realize that this was a small sign of what was to come?

 

One afternoon I had to move my little family of Ancistrus to a smaller home. I had to move them because of a recent explosion of newborn fry from multiple African cichlids. I needed “grow out” room and I needed it quickly.

I moved the Ancistrus family into a 10 gallon wide, but to compensate I added more hiding places and an additional overflow filter. They seemed content.

Two days later when I returned home from work I went to feed the fish and all the fish were dead, except for one male. The bodies were strewn all over the tank. There were bite marks and blood along with the beat up bodies. I thought that there was breeding or spawning ritual that had gotten out of hand. The lone remaining male refused to come out of his clay pot. I believed that he was either very afraid of what had happened and that he had only gotten caught up into the ecstasy of the spawn or that he was remorseful of what he had done and was seeking solace or penance for his wrongdoing.

 

I let a few months go by and when the fry problems resolved themselves I returned the male to his original 20 gallon long. Much to his delight I had obtained, from a local pet shop, a pair of females; one his size and one slightly larger. I figured that they could take care of themselves. All was fine for several months and then I was asked to “loan out” my smaller female ancistrus to a good friend. Now there was only the two of them.

 

Several months went by with the two fish getting along famously. The male would allow the female near his clay pot and on the wood piece adjacent to his home. He never bothered her. They would eat frozen bloodworms and zucchini together, the seemed like the perfect couple. I could hear the “pitter patter” of little baby ancistrus any day now. The male would be out more eating and seeming to store up food reserves for the soon to come day of nest guarding.

 

After about a week I went to see how the “newly weds” were behaving and I could not find the female anywhere. The male was in his clay pot and he was not coming out. I finally found the female wedged into a conch shell. She was inside as far as she could go and could not back out. I could not understand why this had happened? I had to resort to using wire cutters to cut her out. She was just barely breathing. She was beaten and bloodied. After I freed her, she died. As I turned her onto her back I noticed a string of yellow eggs still attached to her breeding tube. I assumed that the male was guarding the nest in the clay pot. I saved and froze ten (10) eggs to remind me of this day. I gave the male two weeks. I then investigated the clay pot…. NO EGGS! Why that murdering bastard! He killed again. I realized then and there that there was no saving this evil creature from himself. He only lives for the thrill of killing. I was strongly tempted right then to remove the brute and bounce him off the floor and walls. I then realized that I would be no better than he. I had to think of what justice I could meet out to this sucker-mouthed assassin. There was a fish auction coming up for that weekend. I got an idea!

 

The Sunday of the auction I woke extra early so I could triple bag my ancistrus. I tossed into the bag a couple of Jungle Labs oxygen tablets and added a mild sedative. I wanted this murdering pescadore healthy but subdued. I arrived at the auction and was about to enter my ancistrus into the bags of fish going to the auction block when I noticed a little boy of about ten (10) years old standing on the side. I asked him what he was doing and he said that he was with his daddy and wanted to bring a fish home for his new tank. I asked his dad what type of fish he was keeping. He said that he has a group of South American cichlids called Heros or Cichlosoma dovii. The dominant male was huge, measuring over two feet in length and beats the hell out of anything going into his domain.

 

I said “Wow, what a coincidence? I have just the fish for you!” Let your dovii try to beat up on this sucker catfish! This little ancistrus could withstand anything he had to offer and come back for more. The father looked a little skeptical as I showed him the bag my little murderer was in. I said that don’t let size fool you, this little guy was a bundle of dynamite. The father asked his son if this fish would be the one he wanted and the son was overjoyed. The father insisted that in order to have a deal he must make his son pay for the fish. I said that since it is your son’s fish I would let him have it for 10 cents (one cent for each egg I frooze). The boy paid me and I gave him the fish. The ancistrus had what appeared to be a sly smile on his face, probably anticipating the new havoc he would wrought on his unsuspecting tank mates. As I saw the father and son leave with their prize I could help but think that there is justice after all, now that ancistrus will get his butt kicked over and over again. I turned to see the little boy was rapidly jerking the bag to make the fish “move” in the bag, as he walked to the family car. I smiled as I thought that there is a “pay back justice” even for fish.

 

I left the auction with a bag of whiptail cats. I was now ready for a catfish that seemed to be on tranquilizers. If I get babies great, if not that’s OK also. Be careful the next time you seek out ancistrus catfish, they may contain one that is an ancistrus assassin!

Author: Joe Graffagnino

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President’s Message – March 2017

by on Mar.28, 2017, under President's Message

Dear Aquarist,

If you missed our March event, then you missed a fantastic birthday cake. Thanks to Marie and Victoria we had a fishy and aquarium looking 106th birthday cake! Also the author of The Dragon Behind The Glass, Emily Voigt, provided a very informative presentation of her expeditions to find the ultra rare Asian red arowana, in the wild. She had assistance along her journey from such notable aquarists as Tyson Roberts and Heiko Bleher, among others. It was a great presentation and well received by our members.

Next month, we welcome back Todd Gardner, whose topic for the evening shall be Long Island, NY: An unlikely hotspot for marine ornamental. Todd’s discussion will be about catching saltwater fish right off of our local beaches. Todd has spoken at our club many times in the past and always gives a great talk.

As always, we will have free parking and refreshments. There are sure to be great items available, but they do go quick.

In response to your requests, we have changed our routine. Doors open at 7:30 pm, for viewing of auction items. The speaker will go on at 8:00 pm and last for one hour, so be on time. Our auction will commence within 15 minutes after the speaker concludes, with the goal of having the meeting conclude earlier than it has in the past.

We would like to thank our members and our sponsors for their constant generous donations that keep us going. Anyone who has any aquatic items, supplies or equipment, which would include healthy livestock of fish, corals or plants, we always welcome the donation.

If anyone has any topics they want to hear an expert speak on, or any specific speaker, please tell us.

Steven Matassa
President

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President’s Message – February 2017

by on Mar.06, 2017, under President's Message

Dear Aquarist,

Happy Valentine’s Day and Happy Anniversary to the BAS! The cold and snow of February got a heat wave in the form of our speaker, Patrick Donston, whose topic for the evening was “Biodiversity Practices for Reef & Planted Exhibits.” Patrick has spoken here many times and always comes up big to a packed house. He graced our club again this month and, as always, gave a great talk. He is definitely one of my favorite speakers. For those who don’t know, he owns Absolutely Fish in Clifton, New Jersey, which is one of the best coral, fish and plant stores you’ll ever see. He continuously has a great assortment of livestock and a knowledgeable staff; it’s definitely worth the trip. Patrick is also a very generous sponsor to our club, and we thank him for his loyal support and donations. He has once again invited the BAS members to come on out to the store in a group this Spring/early Summer, promised to open early to accommodate us, and a larger discount than usual on our purchases.

For March, our guest speaker will be Emily Voigt, the esteemed author of the novel, The Dragon Behind the Glass, a true story of power, obsession and the world’s most coveted fish, who will highlight her search for the Asian red arowana in the wild. An Asian tycoon paid $150,000 for a single arowana. People have been robbed and even murdered in their quest to possess this fish. The date of her talk will be Friday, March 10th at 7:30 pm.
Due to February’s inclement weather, we thought that March would be better for our 106th anniversary celebration. We shall then have a birthday cake for your enjoyment.

In response to your requests, we will be changing our methods starting in March. The speaker will start at 8:00 pm and last for one hour. Our auction will commence within 15 – 20 minutes after the speaker concludes, with the goal of having the meeting conclude earlier than it has in the past.

We would like to thank our members and our sponsors for their constant generous donations that keep us going. Anyone who has any aquatic items, supplies or equipment, and that would include healthy livestock of fish, corals or plants, we always welcome the donation.

If anyone has any topics they want to hear an expert speaker on, or any specific speaker, please tell us.

Steven Matassa
President

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South Jersey Guppy Group All Species Auction – May 21, 2017

by on Jan.25, 2017, under Announcements

South Jersey Guppy Group All Species Auction – May 21, 2017

The South Jersey Guppy Group is proud to announce that they are having an All Species Tropical Fish Auction….. Sunday May 21st …. at the GriggsTown Fire House located in GriggsTown, NJ 08540  …. Free Parking  ……

 

For more info visit their website…

http://www.south-jersey-guppy-group.com/

 

 

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Manhattan Aquariums Grand Re-Opening Sale

by on Jan.20, 2017, under Announcements

Manhattan Aquariums announces a Grand Re-Opening Sale January 21-22.

Please check it out

522 West 37 Street, New York, NY 

212-594-2272

https://manhattanaquariums.myshopify.com/

 

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President’s Message – January 2017

by on Jan.20, 2017, under President's Message

Dear Aquarist,

Happy New Year to all! Our first event for 2017 was a rousing success. The snow and ice stopped to allow our guest speaker Michael Barber to present his talk without all of us worrying about the elements. Michael’s talk was titled “Tropical Fish Collecting & Wildlife Expeditions.” He has partnered with our good friend (and a person we know well since he spoke in Brooklyn on several occasions) Ian Fuller, the international corydorus expert. Michael, Ian and others take aquarists on expeditions for collecting South American species, mainly from Peru. Whatever your personal favorite species that you want to collect in the wild, they will take and also ship the specimens back for you. They specialize in catfish, cichlids, killies and characins such as tetras and hatchetfish. For anyone that wants to collect fish and stay in a modern facility with experts in their various fields, then Go Wild Peru is the place to go! Get a group of friends together and contact Michael Barber at Michael@GoWildPeru.com. I know you will love it!

For February, our friend and sponsor returns – Pat Donston, owner of Absolutely Fish in Clifton, NJ. Pat’s topic for the evening will be “Biodiversity Practices for Reef & Planted Exhibits.” Pat has been our guest speaker many times over the years and is an expert in his field. I know that you will thoroughly enjoy his presentation.
February is also our 106th birthday! On Valentine’s Day, 1911, our forefathers created our great society. Make sure you come down and wish all of us a very happy birthday and many, many more.

Doors open at 7:30. As always, there’s free parking and refreshments. Remember, we can always use help. If anyone wants to help out in any way, please let us know. See me personally or any officer or board member. If anyone has any topics they want to hear expert speakers on, or any specific speaker, please tell us that also.

We would like to thank our members and our sponsors for their constant generous donations that keep us going. Anyone who has any aquatic items, supplies or equipment, and that would include healthy livestock of fish, corals or plants, we always welcome the donation.

Thanks and see you next month!

Steven Matassa
President

 

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President’s Message – December 2016

by on Dec.31, 2016, under President's Message

Dear Aquarist,

Our December Holiday Party closed out another calendar year at BAS with our annual holiday party at the Bridgeview Diner, and it went off very well. We handed out our awards and certificates for writing articles for our award winning publication Aquatica. We also won many awards from the Federation of American Aquarium Societies (FAAS). We celebrated the acknowledgement of our many sponsors and benefactors; without them we would not exist.

Come January 13, we will have Michael Barber kick off the new calendar year with his talk on “Tropical Fish Collecting & Wildlife Expeditions.” As always, we will meet on the second Friday of the month, and have free parking and refreshments. Doors open at 7:30 pm.

At our January event, we will be raffling off two tickets to the Kingsborough College play that runs between February and May, 2017.

The members voted for where they want to go for a club bus trip. We will be going to the Baltimore Aquarium on a Saturday in either April or May. We will also visit a couple of local fish stores on the return trip. However, we are still working on a price for the trip. Please let us know of your interest so we can investigate costs.

We continue to have several vacant slots for our Officers and Board members. The openings are 1st Vice President, Exchange Editor and Treasurer. Also there are several Board slots open. Having these positions unfilled creates a negative impact on what the club can do for our mem¬bers. As with any organization, less people means less gets done. This is your club and we are asking you to step up and help out. Vacancies in vital positions make a huge difference as to what we can provide to you, our members! Please help out. One thing that we must drop is our 50/50 for livestock at our April and November events since we do not have a Treasurer to coordinate.

Also, if you want to see different speakers and learn about different aquatic systems, fish, plants and marine life, please let me know. The elected officials of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society are here to serve YOU! Let us know what you want and why because it’s helpful to everyone. It is important that you visit and patronize our sponsors. It goes full circle: by helping them, they are also helping you as hobbyists and everyone is helping the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, so help us, help you!

For more info, please call our BAS Hotline at (718) 837-4455, or visit our modern website at www.brooklynaquariumsociety.org.

On a more personal note – any member who wants to attend a Board meeting, which are held at Education Hall of the New York Aquarium on the 1st Friday of the month, September through June, please notify me at (347) 277-4793 by the Tuesday before the meeting.

Steven Matassa
President

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Aquarium Bus Trip

by on Nov.21, 2016, under Announcements

In response to members’ request for a bus trip to popular aquariums, we provide this option sheet. The locations are the Boston Aquarium, Baltimore Aquarium or the Riverhead Aquarium. The location with the most votes will be investigated for costs and time factors. These are really great fun day trips, the sort of trip most of us would never do on our own. We leave & depart from NY Aquarium early in the morning and arrive back at the NY Aquarium that evening. The trip is planned for the Spring, on a weekend, either in April or May, 2017. At the November 11 Event we’ll have questionnaires to see what dates would be best for members. The selected location will be announced at our January event, along with the associated costs. Full payment must be received by the March 10th Event.

 

See Flyer…

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2017 American Livebearer Association Convention, May 4-7

by on Nov.21, 2016, under Announcements

2017 American Livebearer Association (ALA) Convention | May 4 – 7 | St. Louis, MO

Welcome to the American Livebearers Association Convention 2017. 

Come enjoy the annual get together of Ovoviviparous and Viviparous fish fans. This year we will have an amazing show! The Missouri Aquarium Society and Gateway Guppy Associates have teamed up to bring you two shows in one convention. That’s right, you will get to see an International Fancy Guppy Association (IFGA) show as well. There will be speakers throughout the weekend giving lectures on the science, husbandry and habitat topics of livebearers wild and domestic. There will be a HUGE vendor’s showroom, silent auction, raffles, the world’s largest livebearer only auction, Friday night box sale, ONE hour fish sale with rare and fancy livebearers, a nightly hospitality room and fish room tours, along with all of the great local attractions St. Louis has to offer.

More info here…

 

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President’s Message – September 2016

by on Sep.15, 2016, under President's Message

Dear Aquarist,

September is the start of another year at BAS, and it kicked off great. This is our 105th year, and we are still growing stronger and larger. With many familiar faces and plenty of new members joining our ranks, we had a great turn out as well as beautiful weather.  Speaking of familiar faces, our very own Joe Graffagnino gave a talk on his new fish room. The talk went over very well, as do most of our talks. Joe was very informative as to what was used and why, along with how he squeezed in tanks in every possible space. It was educational and very interesting on how he walked us step by step through the basement build out of his fish room from beginning to end.

Next month is our Giant Auction, so there is no speaker and no door charge. We will have many rare and hard to obtain livestock for freshwater and marine set ups, including soft and hard corals and plants. As always, free parking and refreshments. Doors open at 7:30pm. Bring your friends and family, as it is always a fun time for all.   See you in October.
Please visit our website where you can read the Bulletin and enjoy a full color Aquatica. The interactive forums and sponsor sections are truly remarkable. Provided you have given us your email address, you will be getting notifications of club events via email.

I am asking for your help and support. We need knowledgeable members to help fill the void for our Society’s officers and Board members. We have several positions open, such as 1st Vice President, Treasurer and Exchange Editor. How will the loss of these positions affect you? We won’t know what our sister clubs are doing without the Exchange Editor; the 1st VP slot is our main coordinator for trips, breeders awards program, photo contest and many other things that our Society is involved with; without our Treasurer, there are no more 50/50 livestock events. Please get involved – by helping us, you are helping yourself and what you have come to enjoy in our club.

If you want to see different speakers or try different things, please let me know. The elected officials of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society are here to serve YOU! Please let us know what you want and why. It would be helpful to everyone.

It is important that you visit and patronize our sponsors. It goes full circle: by helping them, they are also helping you as hobbyists and everyone is helping the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, so help us, help you!

For more info, please call our BAS Hotline at (718) 837-4455.

On a more personal note – Any member who desires to attend a Board meeting (which are held at the Education Center of the New York Aquarium on the 1st Friday of the month, September through June), please notify me at (347) 277-4793 by the Tuesday previous to the meeting.

Steven Matassa
President

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President’s Message – May 2016

by on Jun.21, 2016, under President's Message

Dear Aquarist,

May was a great month for us at BAS, good weather, and a great auction. We were packed to the maximum capacity allowed. The donation tables and aquatic supplies were bustling with excitement. Also, several established vendors displayed their wares at various tables.

Discounted shirts, hats and patches kept the crowds looking for more. The aquatic supply and equipment tables held many hobbyists’ interest. The auction had almost 250 bags of livestock and that was not counting aquariums, lighting and aquatic stands. It was a late night, but our members are worth it.

In June we have Rit Forcier coming up from Florida. Rit’s topic for the evening will be “Goodeid Livebearers.” As always, there will be free parking and refreshments. Doors open at 7:30 pm. Entry is free to all active members, non-members are asked to donate $5.00 at the door to help offset expenses; however, their donation that night is good towards the cost of annual membership. Members receive discounts in most of our sponsoring stores and free entry to all our auctions.

Anyone wishing to donate any healthy livestock (fish, plants or live corals) or dry goods can bring them to any general meeting. Donations are always welcome and appreciated – it’s what keeps your club healthy!

I must ask for our members’ help – Our Treasurer Denise and Board member Stu Hershkowitz are moving to Florida. We need a Treasurer and Board member. Please, if you have experience in accounting, we need your help.

Also if you want to see different speakers and learn about different aquatic systems, fish, plants and marine life, please let me know. The elected officials of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society are here to serve YOU! So please let us know what you want and why because it would be helpful to everyone. It is important that you visit and patronize our sponsors. It goes full circle: by helping them, they are also helping you as hobbyists and everyone is helping the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, so help us, help you!

For more info, please call our BAS Hotline at (718) 837-4455, or visit our modern website at WWW.BROOKLYNAQUARIUMSOCIETY.ORG.

On a more personal note – any member who wants to attend a Board meeting, which are held at Education Hall of the New York Aquarium on the 1st Friday of the month, September through June, please notify me at (347) 277-4793 by the Tuesday before the meeting.

Steven Matassa
President

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President’s Message – April 2016

by on May.02, 2016, under President's Message

Dear Aquarist,

Our April event was a great way to welcome Spring — by having a renowned speaker provide a lecture on a fascinating subject. Richard Pierce gave an in-depth talk on mysterious and controversial marine species. His topic for the evening was “Seahorses, Pipefish and Sea Dragons.” He warned our members that these creatures are not easy to keep in captivity. Some of these guys can grow to 18 inches in length. Sea horses can have 1,800 fry in a single spawn. It would be very difficult for a hobbyist to provide a sustainable biotope for these creatures. You must plan this out before seeking to obtain these creatures.

Richard was kind enough to be our speaker for the evening, even though he had an obligation to the NEC for the same weekend. Richard is an officer in the NEC and he took time out from his duties at the convention to fulfill his commitment to BAS. We thank him profusely for that.

In our continuing endeavor to educate our members and fellow aquarists, we had a representative from Hydor speak briefly on new medications for both marine and freshwater fish, so our members got a two for one deal. We hope to continue to bring product and manufacturing representatives to our meetings so our members can learn first hand about their new products and how they can improve the quality of life for aquarists.

As always, we had lots of livestock bags at the auction (we had a 50/50 with our registered members for the evening on donated plants, corals and both freshwater and marine fish), great items at the sponsor tables, and new BAS shirts, hats and club patches. We also had a large assortment of FREE refreshments to keep our members satisfied.
The weather was great; we had a packed house — all in all a great night.

Next month we have our May Giant Auction! No guest speaker, but plenty of fish and dry goods presented for our members and guests. As always, parking and refreshments are free. Doors open at 7:30 pm. Hope to see you there!

 

Steve Matassa
President

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Inky the octopus escapes New Zealand aquarium.

by on Apr.13, 2016, under Uncategorized

The great escape: Inky the octopus legs it to freedom from New Zealand aquarium

 

An octopus has made a brazen escape from the national aquarium in New Zealand by breaking out of its tank, slithering down a 50m drain pipe and disappearing into the sea.

In scenes reminiscent of Finding Nemo, Inky – a common New Zealand octopus – made his dash to freedom after the lid of his tank was accidentally left slightly ajar.

Staff believe that in the middle of the night, while the aquarium was deserted, Inky clambered to the top of his cage, down the side of the tank and traveled across the floor of the aquarium…

read full story here….

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President’s Message – March 2016

by on Mar.16, 2016, under President's Message

Dear Aquarist,

Our March event was another BAS milestone –- we are now 105 years and 1 month old. To help us celebrate this unique event, we had to bring in a unique speaker. Sal Silvestri came down from Connecticut and brought with him some old Brooklyn friends that have not graced our door in many, many years, such as Basil Holubis and Artie Platt. Sal spoke a few times in Brooklyn, but it was at least a decade ago. Sal talked about what he knows best, which is Apistogrammas! His topic for the evening was “Breeding and Maintaining Apistogramma genus & other South American Dwarf Cichlids.” He gave a great presentation and spoke about many rare and hard to find species. Sal has a knack for making the hard stuff look and sound easy.

Next month is our April event and we will have Richard Pierce coming from Rhode Island. Richard is a very interesting speaker and has a wide and diverse background in the aquarium hobby. He is into marine fish, killies and cichlids. He is affiliated with many organizations like the Tropical Fish Society of Rhode Island and he is an officer in the Northeast Council of Aquarium Societies. In fact, the NEC convention is on the same weekend as our meeting and he will come to our club and then return to his duties at the NEC – WOW, talk about dedication! Richard’s topic for the evening will be “Seahorses, Pipefish and Sea Dragons.” Rich will take the mystery and false rumors away and give the straight talk about raising these amazing creatures in your home aquarium. As always, the meetings will be at the NY Aquarium Education Hall. Doors open at 7:30 PM. And, as always, there is Free Parking and Free Refreshments.

Please visit our website where you can read the Bulletin and enjoy a full color Aquatica. The interactive forums and sponsor sections are truly remarkable. Provided you have given us your email address, you will be getting notifications of club events via email.

I am asking again for your help and support. Our Treasurer Denise and our Board member Stu Hershkowitz are moving to Florida soon, so we will need a new Treasurer and Board member. Please if you have experience in accounting, we need your help. Also, if you want to see different speakers or try different things, please let me know. The elected officials of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society are here to serve YOU! Please let us know what you want and why. It would be helpful to everyone.

It is important that you visit and patronize our sponsors. It goes full circle: by helping them, they are also helping you as hobbyists and everyone is helping the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, so help us, help you!

For more info, please call our BAS Hotline at (718) 837-4455, or visit our modern website at WWW.BROOKLYNAQUARIUMSOCIETY.ORG.

On a more personal note – Any member who desires to attend a Board meeting, which are held at Education Hall of the New York Aquarium on the 1st Friday of the month, September through June, please notify me at (347) 277-4793 by the Tuesday previous to the meeting.
Steve Matassa
President

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President’s Message – February 2016

by on Feb.23, 2016, under President's Message

Dear Aquarist,

February was cold, but a warm month for BAS, since we had a great speaker, Joe Caparatta of Manhattan Aquarium, who packed the house. Joe spoke on a new marine system for reef tanks called the Triton Method. This was not Joe’s first talk at our club and, as always, he was informative.

We also had a great auction, clothing and equipment tables, free refreshments and free parking; a very good deal for all. We at BAS always try to do our best at our events, but if you think we are missing something, we want to hear from you, our members, so please let us know.

Next month we will have Sal Silvestri speaking on “Breeding and Maintaining Apistogramma Genus and other South American Dwarf Cichlids.” Doors will open at 7:30 pm on March 11. For all future events, please check our web site – www.basny.org’

Remember, if not for our local pet store sponsors, BAS would not be able to survive, so please patronize our loyal sponsor stores because they keep us up and running.

If any of our members have a topic they want to hear speakers talk on or have ideas about our events, we want to know about them. We need your feedback to keep our club going strong. Don’t be shy – let us hear from you! Members can contact us at our hotline (718) 837-4455 or visit our web site www.brooklynaquariumsociety.org, where you can find our upcoming events or join our BAS Forum.

The BAS Forum is a great place for your questions and answers, and to buy or sell aquarium items. Members can also bring up new ideas at our Board meeting on the first Friday of the month in the NY Aquarium Education Hall. If you want to attend a Board meeting to help out or just to express your thoughts, you are always welcome. Please call me at (347) 277-4793. You must call by the Tuesday previous to the meeting. The next Board meeting is March 4, 2016. Hope to see you there.

 

Thanks and see you next month!

Steven Matassa
President

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