Threadfin Rainbows

Threadfin Rainbows By Joe Graffagnino

 The Latin name for these beautiful fish from New Guinea and northern Australia is Iriatherina werneri. These nervous and sensitive fish thrive in slow moving streams with heavy vegetation. According to the Master Index of Freshwater Fishes, they enjoy a pH of 6.0 – 8.0, with a designated hardness from 5 -12 and a water temperature of 79 – 86 degrees Fahrenheit.

I keep two males and 4 females in a 10 gallon tank, with a corner filter containing charcoal and ammonia chips and one or two artificial yarn spawning mops. They prefer a dark green mop that hangs from a cork or 35mm film canister to almost an inch from the bottom of the tank. I keep no gravel or plants in the tank, only the mop. I have tried either light blue or black yarn mops with little success.  With the dark green mop I have been averaging 40 eggs per week. They prefer to lay their eggs between the middle of the mop to the bottom. I pluck the eggs from the mop on a weekly basis moving them to a plastic shoebox where I allow the eggs to hatch with a slight amount of Acriflavine to prevent fungus. In a few days you can see the tiny babies swimming across the top of the plastic box. I then move the fry to a larger plastic box to grow out. These are slow growing fish that need rotifers, artemia or Small Fry Food. After a few weeks, with 3 times a week water changes (only with aged water), they are large enough to take baby brine shrimp.

Water changes are extremely important for this fish to maintain good health. I change the water in a 35 gallon tank next to the Threadfin rainbow fish tank. After the freshwater has been filled in the larger tank, I wait several hours or the next day to take water from that tank to replace water removed during a water change. Using this mixture of new and aged water, there is no stress on the parents or fry. I feed the adults live or frozen brine shrimp and cyclopeeze, because their mouths are small, twice daily and perform weekly water changes of 20%, as outlined above, in the adults’ aquarium.


Threadfin rainbows are one of the most beautiful freshwater fish I have ever seen. The females are a silvery color, but the males have long flowing fins of black, red and yellow. The males use a flickering of their fins to attract the females to spawn.  If you want to keep an interestingly beautiful fish that will give you hours of enjoyment, then I highly recommend these graceful beauties.

Whiptail Catfish

Whiptail Catfish By Joe Graffagnino

 There are several species of Whiptail catfish which are very difficult to distinguish apart. This catfish species comes from cool, fast moving streams in South America.  The species Latin name is Rineloricara. This type of catfish gets its common name from its slim, armored, flat, and stiff body that has color variations from gray to brown. They are a slow moving, peaceful fish that has a tail fin that extends to a delicate “whip-like” extension. Whiptail cats get about 6 inches in length. The only way I can sex them is the female’s belly is larger than the male’s, as is with most types of catfish.  When the female is pregnant, her stomach is huge; she will sit outside the PVC tube and wait for the male to allow her entrance. As she lays her eggs, he is directly behind her fertilizing them. When completed, the male then chases the female from the tube and he cares for the eggs.
I received my group of a dozen small fish from one of Brooklyn Aquarium Society’s expert fish breeders – Lisa Quilty. Lisa bred the parents in a small PVC tube and brought the fry in for “Breeder Award Points” and she is one of our club’s leading spawners of difficult fish. I brought them home and set the group up in a 10 gallon tank with riverbed gravel, a corner box filter that contained charcoal and ammonia chips and I placed a couple of wood pieces in the tank to make them comfortable. After a few months, I added some small and narrow clay and PVC tubes. The small fish grew quickly with weekly water changes and high protein flake food. To improve their diet, I gave them frozen foods such as blood worms, cyclopeeze and daphnia a couple of times a week. I would, on occasion, provide them with a piece of frozen zucchini that they would ignore until it started getting a fungus on it and then the next day the zucchini would be gone. I guess they will only eat it if it’s soft.


Early one evening, my friend and fellow fish breeder Vinny Babino came over and, as I was showing him the various fish I had in the aquariums, he looked into the whiptail catfish tank which I kept at the end of a long row of tanks that I rarely paid any attention to, and remarked that there appeared to be a lump inside the PVC tube. I looked and then with a flashlight discovered the male was sitting on a batch of green eggs. With this species, the female lays the eggs and the male cares for the eggs, actually gently scraping the eggs to help the fry escape  after about 7 days..
 An interesting note: Vinny had obtained the parents of the fry and had them in his home aquarium. When he went home that evening, his fish had also laid eggs in a PVC tube. Several times afterward, both of our groups laid eggs the same day.

I must have had my fish for approximately 2 years before they spawned.

When the fry became free swimming, I fed them crushed egg flakes, which help fry grow faster, and some frozen zucchini that they allow to soften before eating it. The fry grow quickly with frequent water changes and heavy aeration. The spawning tubes were 6 – 8 inches long and 1” wide, open on both ends. The GH was 2, pH was 6.3 and the temperature was 76 degrees Fahrenheit. After the first pair spawned a second time, 3 weeks after the first spawn, other pairs started breeding. I guess the pheromones in the water activated the others’ spawn cycle. I found 36 babies from the first spawn; in some spawns the eggs were eaten and in others, when the babies were released, the adult whiptails ate them. The spawns became larger and after several months I counted 84 fry in a single spawn. The fry are small so if I didn’t see them on the glass so I could siphon them up, the adults would go for them. I found that these fish need natural wood in the tank, which I believe helps them digest food.

Never use glass gravel for this species of fish.

I highly recommend this delicate in beauty, yet hardy in nature fish for your aquarium. They are a joy to behold and will not bother other fish or plants in your tank. After you have bred them, don’t forget to bring the fry to your local fish club and share the fun with other hobbyists.

Water Chemistry: Osmoregulation, Ionic Imbalance & pH by Joe Gargas

Correct Water Chemistry is the single most important subject for the successful keeping and breeding of Tropical Fish. Water is to fish as air is to human’s; it is the environment that they live in, breed in and get old in. The health and well being of our fish is directly related to their physical water environment. As advanced Hobbyists the more we know about Water Chemistry, the more successful we will be as Fish Keepers and Breeders.

Read the whole article in our own Aquatica, starting on page 7

Breeding The Banded Acara (Bujurquina Vittata)

Breeding The Banded Acara (Bujurquina Vittata) by Joe Graffagnino

The Bujurquina vittata is an interesting biparental mouth brooding South American (basically from Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay) cichlid.  This little beauty, as it doesn’t grow larger than 4.5 inches, is unique because both parents take the fry in their mouth when they move from foraging locations. If predators are about, the fry zoom into the parents’ mouths and the pair makes a quick escape. The parents were fed a diet of African Attack pellets, various types of flakes and live black worms. There were originally 3 females and a male when I got them from friends at the North Jersey Aquarium Society, hence the need to join several fish clubs. It took several months, but eventually I found the male and one of the females prodding the other two females away. Not wanting to have the single females hurt, I moved them to another aquarium. The new pair quickly set up house in the center of the tank.

They are excellent parents, although they are very nervous, zooming across the aquarium at full speed. Fearing for their safety, I taped newspaper on the front glass. To observe them I had to carefully and quietly move to the side panes. I had to limit water changes for fear of upsetting them with a possibility of them eating their fry. They managed to lay their eggs in the inside of a half of a coconut shell, along the top ridge. However, after a few weeks of semi isolation, I was rewarded when I witnessed a cloud of babies rising off the bottom, in the center of their parents. For the first few days of free swimming, the babies rarely left their parents, but as days wore on, they started venturing further away. The parents were trying to corral them into one spot, but the fry didn’t want to hear it. After the babies were swimming for two weeks, I removed the parents to a separate tank. I kept the parents’ tank unlit so as not to spook them. They were able to see from the lights of other aquariums nearby. The babies didn’t seem to mind the absence of their parents and continued to graze off the algae and bits of food around the tank. I started them on frozen baby brine shrimp and crushed flakes. Regular biweekly water changes of 15% declorinated tap water produced larger fry. The environment the fry lived in was 80 degrees Fahrenheit, neutral pH, soft water as are NYC standards. In a couple of weeks, they moved to frozen cyclopeeze and minced blood worms.

 
The males have blue lips, with yellow flush cheeks with a gold streak moving horizontal above their lateral line. The males also have a red trim along the top edge of their dorsal fin. Males have lyre tail strings that extend from their dorsal, anal and tail fins. They have turquoise blue lines in their pectoral finnage and are repeated with aquamarine dots in their anal and in the rear of their dorsal fin. The males develop a slight hump on their forehead. The females are slightly smaller and are blander color wise, but still maintain the aqua blue in their anal and at the end of their dorsal fin. They don’t have the extended fins of the male and are a gray in color with slight yellow in their face and cheeks.


I highly recommend this interesting and pretty fish. Their temperament is mild, they don’t bother tank mates and they eat anything in flake, pellet or frozen form. They do especially love live black worms. I feed them a few pellets or flake and then the live food because it will stay in their stomach longer. This will, in turn, give them greater amounts of protein which produces larger quantities and more fertile eggs. Set them up in a tank of their own, such as a 30 gallon (36”L x 12”w x 20” H) and let them pair off and enjoy their antics.

Breeding American Flag Fish (Jordanella Floridae)

Jordanella Floridae
“Breeding American Flag Fish” by Joe Graffagnino

The Flag fish is a unique specimen for several reasons. First, it is a North American killifish from the state of Florida. Second, the male of the species looks like an American flag. The body has black and blue lines alternating with red lines. When looking at the fish on its side, it appears to have black, blue, red and white dots on its body. Last, there are two types of Flag fish that are identical to each other. The difference is that one type prefers an almost marine environment, with a pH of 8.0, hard water with salt in it. The other type is just the opposite and requires soft water, no salt and acidic pH.

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I managed to obtain two pairs of these beautiful fish from a pet shop hop that members of Brooklyn Aquarium Society took in the summer of 2010 to visit our sponsor retail establishments. I brought them home and placed them in quarantine consisting of a bare 10 gallon tank with a corner filter containing charcoal and ammonia chips. I also placed a few artificial hanging mops in the tank. The pH was 7.6 and the temperature was 80 degrees Fahrenheit. One male chased his tank mates around for a month. They ate sporadically and showed no signs of breeding. When the quarantine time was up, I moved a pair each into 5 gallon tanks, side by side. To prevent aggression between the males, I placed newspaper between the tanks so they couldn’t see each other. A few months went by with no spawning hints, so I decide it’s time to change the environment.

One tank I set up with hard water, alkaline pH and dropped the temperature to 77 degrees Fahrenheit and I left 1 floating mop and 1 mop container filled with gravel so it would remain on the bottom. I softened the water gradually over several weeks and lowered the pH in the other tank, while maintaining the temperature at 80 degrees Fahrenheit. I also added Amazon Black water extract and almond leaves. This time both mops were weighted and remained on the bottom. Both pairs of fish were goven the exact diet of flakes and frozen food (blood worms and daphnia) with feedings every third day of live black worms cut into small pieces.

After several weeks, both pairs started laying eggs. The pair in the hard water had laid approximately a dozen eggs on the mop that stayed on the bottom. All were soft and fungused even with acriflavin added to the tank. A few days later, the pair in the acidic water laid approximately 20 eggs. I removed the eggs into a plastic container and added acriflavin again, but after a couple of days all the eggs fungused. Six days later, the pair in a water environment of 6.0 – 6.2 pH, temperature of 80 degrees Fahrenheit and a GH of 3, laid 13 eggs on a black mop and 132 eggs on a green mop. Out of the 145 eggs that were laid, 115 eggs hatched. These fry were moved to a 5 gallon tank and fed live vinegar eels and frozen rotifers. After a week, they were fed frozen baby brine shrimp and crushed flakes. The pair in the hard water environment stopped laying eggs.

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The American Flag fish is a great killifish that will intrigue you. They are great alone in a tank or with other fish in a well planted, dark gravel aquarium. Whether you want to breed them or not, it is the patriotic fish to keep in every American home. Enjoy them!

Earn 50%* on donated livestock in January, 2012

We will be having a 50/50 split on donated livestock only (corals, fish and plants) for members only.  Members must sign in at the donation desk that they want 50% of whatever their livestock items are auctioned for (no reserves).  The total of all donations must be greater than $5 and your return check will be available for pickup at the next regular meeting.

If you have any questions regarding this event please don’t hesitate to contact us or just post your questions below.

President’s Message – November 2011

November is a wonderful month for many reasons.  First, we had our event on Veterans Day and the Society wants to wish every veteran a happy and safe day. Second, we have Thanksgiving, which is my favorite holiday. Think about it … the majority have the day off as a holiday; you don’t have to buy anything for it — not even a card — and if you’re lucky you can visit someone’s home and eat till you pass out, for free –a great American tradition! And last, we had Anthony Stissi as our guest speaker. Anthony’s topic for the evening was “Lake Tanganyikan Tropheus & Petrochromis Species”.  His talk included great information on how to choose and care for the various cichlid species and showed slides of many of the beautiful and robust fish he breeds. This was Anthony’s first public speaking engagement and he did great. Anthony is one of many new speakers that should go on to become famous lecturers not only throughout the United States, but throughout the world. I predict that Anthony will be a great lecturer and presenter in the near future, watch for him!

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The auction that evening had aquarium supplies, food, lights, fish tanks, wood and metal stands, rocks and gravel, and of course, fish, corals and plants. For the marine enthusiasts there were PJ Cardinals, Clark Clown fish, Kenya Trees, mushroom corals and so much more.

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December is our holiday party. Anyone who will attend should bring something to eat that we shall share with the other holiday well wishes.  Anyone not bringing in food such as an entrée, dessert or a non-alcoholic beverage will be charged $10 per person for admission. The holiday party is the evening we distribute awards for the hard work our members have done all year. Also we will have our Fish Bingo and the winners will be getting some great fishy items.

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Sad news – the longest continuous member of our great Society has passed away. Frank Policastro had been a member since 1964 — that is 47 continuous years. I am happy and proud that we were able to honor Frank at our 100th Birthday celebration this past July. We honored the Society’s past three presidents (Seth Kolker, Al DiSpigna and John Todaro), our former Sgt. At Arms and the persons most responsible for organizing the Breeder Program and for winning the most awards during Fish Shows, Tom Miglio and Frank Policastro. Frank had always been a great historian and had maintained a library of documentation on the Brooklyn Aquarium Society since becoming a member. It was because of Frank that we were able to have as much rich information and his documentation enabled us to flesh out our history for the club journal. Frank will be sorely missed on so many levels, by so many people.

Please visit our new website where you can read the Bulletin and enjoy a full color Aquatica. The interactive forums and sponsor sections are truly enjoyable. Provided you have given us your email address, you will be getting notifications of club events via email.

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I am asking for your help and support. If you want to see different speakers or try different things, please let me know. The elected officials of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society are here to serve YOU! Please let us know what you want and why. It would be helpful to everyone. A survey of our members has been conducted over the past several months as to what you want to see and do as a member – the results will be mentioned at the Holiday party and will be in the January Bulletin.

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It is important that you visit and patronize our sponsors. It goes full circle: by helping them, they are also helping you as hobbyists and everyone is helping the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, so help us, help you!

For more info, please call our BAS Hotline at (718) 837-4455.

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On a more personal note – Any member who desires to attend a Board meeting, which are held at the Education Center of the New York Aquarium on the 1st Friday of the month, please notify me at (718) 238-1792 by the Tuesday previous to the meeting.

Joe Graffagnino
President

BAS Event – “African Cichlids” by Anthony Stissi, November 11, 2011

This BAS meeting was hosted at the New York Aquarium on November 11, 2011

Title: “African Cichlids” by Anthony Stissi

Event Flyer: Download / View Here

Event Photos

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Event Donors

Individuals

Bill Amely, Benjamin Basile, Frank Campo, Steve Chen, John Fox, Mike Gallo, Walter Gallo, Pauline Griffin, Joe Graffagnino, Dexter Haynes, Kay Martin, Chris Matassa, Steve Matassa, Scott Peters, Dan Puleo, Lisa Quilty, Louis Rodreguez, Roger Schillizzi (estate)

Local Stores

Absolutely Fish, Clifton, NJ, Brooklyn Zoo & Aquarium, Brooklyn, NY, Mark’s Discus, Brooklyn, NY, Pacific Aquarium, New York, NY,  Pet Shanty, Scotch Plains, NJ, Royal Aqua World, Brooklyn, NY

President’s Message – October 2011

Our October Giant Auction had 300 items in it. There were aquarium supplies, food, lights, fish tanks, stands, full covers and of course, fish, corals and lots of plants. There were many hard to find items such as African giraffe catfish at 1 ½”, baby electric catfish, and mudskippers. For the marine enthusiasts, there were red brittle starfish, chocolate chip starfish, feather dusters, hermit crabs, yellow tangs, Kenya Trees and so much more. Everyone had a great time and went home with fantastic bargains.

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November will bring Anthony Stessi of Staten Island Cichlids.com. Anthony is an expert on African cichlids and has raised and bred them for many years. His topic for the evening will concentrate on the Petrochromis and Tropheus families. As always, we will have a multi species auction of fish, corals and plants. Come early and stay late because you always have a wonderful time at our monthly meetings. Our unique sales tables will be open for shirts, hats, books, magazines and aquarium equipment and supplies. We will also have a giant raffle for our members.

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I hope to see everyone at our November 11th event. As always, there is free parking and free refreshments.

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Please visit our new website where you can read the Bulletin and enjoy a full color Aquatica. So far, feedback has been very favorable.  We put a lot of effort and hard work into this new web site and we want your reaction as to how you like it. Please get back to me on this. The interactive forums and sponsor sections are truly enjoyable. Provided you have given us your email address, you will be getting notifications of club events via email.

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I am asking for your help and support. If you want to see different speakers or try different things, please let me know. The elected officials of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society are here to serve YOU! Please let us know what you want and why. It would be helpful to everyone. It is important that you visit and patronize our sponsors. It goes full circle: by helping them, they are also helping you as hobbyists and everyone is helping the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, so help us, help you!

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For more info, please call our BAS Hotline at (718) 837-4455

On a more personal note – Any member who desires to attend a Board meeting, which are held at the Education Center of the New York Aquarium on the 1st Friday of the month, please notify me at (718) 238-1792 by the Tuesday previous to the meeting.

Joe Graffagnino
President

BAS Event – “GIANT Fall Auction”, October 14, 2011

This BAS meeting was hosted at the New York Aquarium on October 14, 2011

Title: “GIANT Fall Auction”

Event Flyer: Download / View Here

Event Photos

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Event Donors

Individuals

Bill Amely, Vincent Babino, Amanda Dabydeen, Joe Graffagnino, Gene Kogan, Jim Kupriam, Kay Martin, Steve Matassa, Lisa Quilty, David Ramirez, Roger Schillizzi, Dan Smith, Michael Weiner

Local Stores

Absolutely Fish, Clifton, NJ, Aquatic Express, Queens, NY,  Brooklyn Zoo & Aquarium, Brooklyn, NY, Mushkan Tropicals, Richmond Hill, NY, Nasau Discus, Hicksville, NY, Pacific Aquarium, New York, NY, Pet Shanty, Scotch Plains, NJ, Petland Discounts, Long Island, NY, Royal Aqua World, Brooklyn, NY, Tri-County Tropicals, Richmond Hill, NY

BAS Event – “Unique Corals You Can Keep” by Joseph Caparatta, September 9, 2011

This BAS meeting was hosted at the New York Aquarium on September 9, 2011

Title: “Unique Corals You Can Keep” by Joe Caparatta

Event Flyer: Download / View Here

Event Photos

 will be posted soon…

Event Donors

Individuals

Frank Campo, Steve Chen; Joe Graffagnino; Marty Karfinkle, Gene Kogan, Scott Peters, Dan Puleo, Mike Roman, Roger Schillizzi, Dan Smith


Local Stores

Absolutely Fish, Clifton, NJ, Brooklyn Zoo & Aquarium, Brooklyn, NY, Mark’s Discus, Brooklyn, NY, Pacific Aquarium, New York, NY, Pet Qua, New York, NY, Pet Shanty, Scotch Plains, NJ, Royal Aqua World, Brooklyn, NY

President’s Message – September 2011

The new season kick-off meeting of September featuring Joe Caparetta was a great success. Joe’s topic for the evening was “Unique Corals You Can Keep.”  We had “technical difficulties” with the PowerPoint presentation, so Joe had to “wing” it and just talk about keeping marine corals, fish and the proper maintenance to sustain these livestock. The Q & A went on long after Joe went off camera. Everyone enjoyed this very different type of presentation.

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October brings our Fall Giant auction featuring marine fish and corals, freshwater plants, fish and invertebrates. As always, we will have many bags of your favorite species. Great bargains will be available, so make sure you come to the greatest auction in New York on October 14th. Our unique sales tables will be open for shirts, hats, books, magazines and other aquarium equipment and supplies. We will also have a giant raffle for our members and guests.

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I hope to see everyone at our October 14th event. As always, there is free parking and free refreshments.

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Please visit our new website where you can read the Bulletin and enjoy a full color Aquatica. So far, feedback has been very favorable.  We put a lot of effort and hard work into this new web site and we want your reaction as to how you like it. Please get back to me on this. The interactive forums and sponsor sections are truly enjoyable. Provided you have given us your email address, you will be getting notifications of club events via email.

I am asking for your help and support. If you want to see different speakers or try different things, please let me know. The elected officials of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society are here to serve YOU! Please let us know what you want and why. It would be helpful to everyone. It is important that you visit and patronize our sponsors. It goes full circle: by helping them, they are also helping you as hobbyists and everyone is helping the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, so help us, help you!

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On a more personal note – Any member who desires to attend a Board meeting, held at the Education Center of the New York Aquarium on the 1st Friday of the month, please notify me at (718) 238-1792 by the Tuesday previous to the meeting.

Joe Graffagnino
President

Vendor Expo, Fish Show & Giant Auction hosted by NJAS, October 21-23

Come spend the weekend with New Jersey’s largest Tropical Fish Club. The event includes a Vendor Expo on Friday and Saturday, as well as a fish show Saturday also, and a giant tropical fish, plant and dry good auction on Sunday. There will be multiple vendors Friday & Saturday, silent auctions, food and drinks available all three days.

Visit www.njas.net for more info.

Friday, Saturday & Sunday
October 21 – 23, 2011
Quality Inn 10 Polito Avenue, Lyndhurst, NJ  07071

Like Blue Zoo Radio? You’ll love Blue Zoo TV!

Following a successful award winning season of Blue Zoo TV presented by HIKARI, where an ADDY Award for 2010 was presented to the show for “offering a great promotional tool and entertainment value to the web”. Blue Zoo TV is back for the 2011 season.

The first show, “Cleaning a Pond” visits master breeder and in-home fish room aquarist, Charley Grimes. “Cleaning a Pond” reflects over 4600 emails to Blue Zoo asking to illustrate the subject. The show covers the cleaning at a “high rate of speed”. to add some entertainment value to a sometimes mundane job.

To view the new show on Blue Zoo TV presented by HIKARI, go to http://www.bluezootv.com/ and click “Cleaning the Pond”.

New episodes will be released every week to ten days for the remainder of the season.

Blue Zoo TV would also like to thank Hikari,  Kordon, Tunze and OnederSave for their continued support as well as our listeners, viewers and fans.

Blue Zoo TV viewing is available on www.bluezootv.com, www.bluezooradio.com, ITunes, Youtube, Facebook, www.sportstalknetwork.com and Twitter

Thank You!

Frank Reece
Host
Twitter: @bluezooradio

President’s Message – June 2011

Dear Aquarist,

Happy Summer! At our last meeting before our summer break, we had our election of officers. Most of the people in their current positions stayed the same, with a couple of exceptions. Adam Engerow had to leave his post as Corresponding Secretary for personal reasons due to college demands and Lita Goldberg went from Board member to the Sgt. At Arms position. We wish Adam great success with his academic endeavors and Lita much praise in accepting her new position.

Our June event had Carol Ross of our sister club – Bucks County – in from Pennsylvania to provide a presentation on “Collecting Fish In Peru.” Carol’s presentation brought out the vast beauty in the untouched areas of South America , but also highlighted the lack of modern conveniences and that life is, at times, just bare necessities. It was an in-depth look at how people and businesses exist in that part of the world.

The next time we shall meet will be at our birthday party at the NY Aquarium on July 8 starting at 7:00 PM. Please remember that this party is by invitation only. When your reservation invitation card has been received you and your party’s names will be listed at the entrance to the party. If you need to change a name for an attendee, you must contact me immediately so I can change the name on the list. If the attendee’s name is not on the list at the entrance to the Aquarium, they will not be allowed to enter!

If you cannot make the party, then we will get together again at our September 9th event featuring Joe Caparette.  His topic for the evening will be “Unique Corals You Can Keep.”  As always, there is free parking and free refreshments.

Please visit our new website where you can read the Bulletin and enjoy a full color Aquatica. So far the results have been very favorable and we put a lot of effort and hard work into this new web site and we want your feedback as to how you like it. Please get back to me on this. The interactive forums and sponsor sections are truly enjoyable. Also you will be getting notifications of club events via email.

I am asking for your help and support. If you want to see different speakers or try different things, please let me know. The elected officials of the Brooklyn Aquarium Society are here to serve YOU! Please let us know what you want and why. It would be helpful to everyone. It is important that you visit and patronize our sponsors. It goes full circle, by helping them, they are also helping you as hobbyists and everyone is helping the Brooklyn Aquarium Society, so help us, help you!

.

For more info please call our BAS Hotline at (718) 837-4455 

On a more personal note – Any member who desires to attend a Board meeting, which are held at the Education Center of the New York Aquarium on the 1st Friday of the month, please notify me at (718) 238-1792 by the Tuesday previous to the meeting.

Joe Graffagnino
President

BAS Event – “Collecting in Peru” by Carol Ross, June 10, 2011

This BAS meeting was hosted at the New York Aquarium on June 10, 2011

Title: “Collecting Fish In Peru” by Carol Ross

Event Flyer: Download / View Here

Event Photos

 [nggallery id=5]

Event Donors

Individuals

Bill Amely, Steve Chen, Brian Dunn, Joe Graffagnino, Pauline Griffin, Kay Martin, Scott Peters, Dan Puleo, Dan Smith

Local Stores

Absolutely Fish, Clifton, NJ, Brooklyn Zoo & Aquarium, Brooklyn, NY, Mark’s Discus, Brooklyn, NY, Pacific Aquarium, New York, NY, Pet Qua, New York, NY, Pet Shanty, Scotch Plains, NJ, Royal Aqua World, Brooklyn, NY